Winter Preparation

/Winter Preparation
Winter Preparation 2016-11-01T17:31:03+00:00

Conserve Energy and Protect Your Home

  • Conserve Energy and Protect Your Home
  • Disconnect or winterize, and drain garden hose and irrigation systems, pools, and spas according to manufacturer’s recommendations. Drain outside pipes and faucets too.

Conserve Energy and Protect Your Home

  • Disconnect or winterize, and drain garden hose and irrigation systems, pools, and spas according to manufacturer’s recommendations. Drain outside pipes and faucets too.
  • Fit exposed pipes / outside faucets with insulation sleeves or wrapping. The more insulation the better. Caulk and seal cracks and holes in outside walls and foundations near water pipes with caulking.
  • Let your faucets drip during extended cold periods – this water flow will help prevent pipes from freezing.
    Open your under-sink cabinets to allow heat to circulate around your plumbing fixtures.

 

Taking a Winter Vacation?

  • If you plan to be away from your home for an extended period of time during the winter:
  • Call the Lynden Utility Billing at (360) 354-2829 to have your water service temporarily turned off.
  • Turn off the water supply lines to your clothes washer.
  • Turn off your hot water tank.
  • Eliminate drafts: close and insulate vents with rigid foam, including crawl space vents. In winter, when the air is drier, closing the vents will reduce the chance that the pipes in the crawl space might freeze. Just remember to remove the plugs when the weather turns mild in the spring.

The Problem with Frozen Pipes
Pipes that freeze most frequently are those that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, water sprinkler lines and water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages or kitchen cabinets. Also, pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation are subject to freezing.
Frozen water in pipes can cause water pressure buildup between the ice blockage and the closed faucet at the end of a pipe – this could cause the pipes to burst at their weakest point. Water expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the “strength” of the pipe, expanding water can cause pipes to break.
Frozen water pipes can stop water service and be expensive to repair or replace for homeowners, so it’s worth it to take extra precautions to ensure your home is protected from the occasional cold snap.
What should I do if my pipes freeze?
If you turn on a faucet and get no water, your pipes may be frozen. Rubbing the pipes with warm, damp rags may slowly thaw the line, or if possible, expose the pipe to the inside heat. Never try to thaw a frozen pipe with a torch or open flame; instead, place a warm towel or rag around the pipe or try a hair dryer on a low setting to thaw out the frozen pipe